Trinitarian Thinking

Tony builds a breathtaking theory of human creativity in this talk.

He begins by critiquing the dominance of the scientific method as the only road to truth. He points out that this dominance has been hostile to faith, and has patronised faith as anti-intellectual. But he points out the limitations of scientific logic, and in particular, its anti-humanistic assumptions. Then he offers an alternative thinking methodology whose origins he finds in Aristotle, whose ultimate manifestation he finds in all of human creativity (including strategy) – and whose mandate he finds in Genesis 1 and 2 and the command to rule creation. This talk summarises Tony’s PhD thesis.

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Human creativity and the two roads to truth


Tony builds a breathtaking theory of human creativity in this talk.He begins by critiquing the dominance of the scientific method as the only road to truth. He points out that this dominance has been hostile to faith, and has patronised faith as anti-intellectual. But he points out the limitations of scientific logic, and in particular, its anti-humanistic assumptions. Then he offers an alternative thinking methodology whose origins he finds in Aristotle, whose ultimate manifestation he finds in all of human creativity (including strategy) – and whose mandate he finds in Genesis 1 and 2 and the command to rule creation. This talk summarises Tony’s PhD thesis.


Trinity and Creation: part one


This talk comes in two parts. In this the first part, Tony outlines why the creative act lies at the heart of the Trinitarian Godhead.
He bases this part of the talk on Jonathan Edwards’ great essay “The Ends for which God Created the Worlds”. Look out for a very important interaction with Mark Strom towards the end of the talk, which turns the Christian engagement with the world on its head – from ‘application’ to ‘discovery’. There are Powerpoint slides to accompany the talk which are on the website, so use them as you listen.


Trinity and Creation: part two


This is part two of Tony’s talk on the Trinity and creativity. Having established the intrinsically creativity character of the Trinity, he moves onto the role of humanity in this creative process as ‘trinitarian agents’. At the end of the talk, he addresses the question of the role of sin and the ‘Fall’ in this otherwise optimistic and expansive picture. Again, a set of Powerpoint slides accompanies this talk (see the slides called ‘Trinitarian agents’.


Trinity and language


Tony introduces ‘language’ as the archetypal view of the Trinity. He argues that the ‘Trinity’ is the utterly novel invention of the Christian church – it is an enigma that is unique and central to the Christian belief system. We do well to peer into it. He explains how the doctrine developed in the fourth century, and then how it slipped into neglect after the Reformation. The climax of the talk is the stunning moves Jonathan Edwards made to not only recover the Trinity, but to lift the whole debate to a new breathtaking level. This new view radically reshapes how we look at creation, and ourselves.